2019 Gallery Events


Artist statement for Pate de Verre show    Pate de Verre translates to “paste of glass”. This series of bowls is created by mixing powdered glass or fine granules of glass with a medium to create a paste and that is then pressed into a form. The majority of these bowls were fired to 1236°, a slump temperature. A few were fired to 1350°, which is a tack fuse. The higher the temperature the more likely the bowl will distort. The glass becomes more glossy at the higher temperature.  By limiting the form to the use of one bowl, I was able to concentrate on techniques that would bring about different decorative results. This included reliefs, inlays and exploration of mixing colors.  By using various volumes of the paste, I determined that, this also, effected the distortion of the bowl.  I love experimenting with different approaches to fused glass. I wanted to be able to create a bowl that was deeper than one that could be achieved by slumping. I had seen several bowls where this technique was used and was intrigued by the versatility of the technique.  I am satisfied with the over all results. The fragility of the first four bowls is in sharp contrast to how the color makes them look like terra cotta. I was pleased and excited with the variety of results I got using the larger granules of glass, by mixing sizes of granules and mixing colors.  A special thanks to John MacDonald for creating the ceramic mold I used for these bowls.

Artist statement for Pate de Verre show

Pate de Verre translates to “paste of glass”. This series of bowls is created by mixing powdered glass or fine granules of glass with a medium to create a paste and that is then pressed into a form. The majority of these bowls were fired to 1236°, a slump temperature. A few were fired to 1350°, which is a tack fuse. The higher the temperature the more likely the bowl will distort. The glass becomes more glossy at the higher temperature.

By limiting the form to the use of one bowl, I was able to concentrate on techniques that would bring about different decorative results. This included reliefs, inlays and exploration of mixing colors.

By using various volumes of the paste, I determined that, this also, effected the distortion of the bowl.

I love experimenting with different approaches to fused glass. I wanted to be able to create a bowl that was deeper than one that could be achieved by slumping. I had seen several bowls where this technique was used and was intrigued by the versatility of the technique.

I am satisfied with the over all results. The fragility of the first four bowls is in sharp contrast to how the color makes them look like terra cotta. I was pleased and excited with the variety of results I got using the larger granules of glass, by mixing sizes of granules and mixing colors.

A special thanks to John MacDonald for creating the ceramic mold I used for these bowls.